Consumers to take control of their Personal Data

My Intro: The following passages were published by the Star in their Sunday Edition (6th January 2013) at pp 23-24. The article is about what Malaysian consumers should know and do in relation to their personal data. It is based on another interview the journalist had with me. For the benefit of the readers, I reproduce some parts of the article in this page. Should you want to read it in full, check the newspaper’s page HERE.

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“Consumers, take control of your personal data”

The Personal Data Protection Act 2010 has come into force, but the public will have to do their part to make it effective.

Credit: The Star Online

Credit: The Star Online

EAGER to win the grand prize, Maria (not her real name) did not hesitate to “drop” her name card at the door for a lucky draw at a company dinner. Weeks later, she found herself inundated with phone calls and text messages offering different services and products.

It is an accepted practice in Malaysia to leave our call cards or personal information at the registration counter of public events. But have you ever wondered what your personal data will be used for later? Or how it will be stored?

This has become so common here that no one thinks twice about the risks and implications, says personal data protection law expert Dr Sonny Zulhuda.

Under the newly enforced Personal Data Protection Act 2010 (PDPA), however, this practice will have to be reviewed, particularly for business entities that use these occasions as an opportunity to build their network of potential customers.

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Personal Data Protection Act 2010 will be Enforced from 01.01.2013 — Or so it was said…

By Sonny Zulhuda

That is it. No more waiting or being complacent.

The Minister of Information, Communications and Culture  of Malaysia, Datuk Seri Rais Yatim was reported today (23 Oct 2012) as saying that the crucial Act will be enforced beginning of the year 2013 — that is less than two months from now. The report from The Sun Daily can be viewed here.

Credit: The Sun Daily (c) 2012

Credit: The Sun Daily (c) 2012

And when it is implemented, as prescribed by the Act itself, data users will have three months to prepare to comply with the rules and regulations on personal data that they collect, process or otherwise store. In total, companies as well as individual data users will only have five months to prepare themselves before the Data Protection Commissioner can knock their doors if he wishes to inspect their personal data system and the level of compliance.

Also, it would mean that the consumers, termed as data subjects, would be able to come and check the accuracy of their personal data collected and processed at their bankers, telecommunications providers, or any other services providers that they had contract with.

Who will be implicated? Continue reading

Penal Code for Cyber Crime

By: Sonny Zulhuda

Cyber Crime is any crime that involves computer or computer system either as a target or as a medium. With this definition, one could should not be mistaken into thinking that cyber crime only takes place when a computer genius manages to interfere with a networked computer system, bypassing complicated security, encryption or any access-controlling mechanism.

Cyber crime includes those ‘conventional crimes’ in which the criminal has found a new way to launch their wrong-doing. by way of computer network or otherwise being facilitated by information technologies.

The legal role of addressing and curbing cyber crime can therefore be attributed to the conventional law of crime. In Malaysia, the main statute is the Penal Code.

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