Cyber Security in the Era of Open Government: A note from the University of Sydney

By: Sonny Zulhuda

I was honored to be invited by the University of Sydney to talk about this on November 2016. The event, called “Cyber Security in the Era of Open Government”, sought to identify innovative solutions for improving the security of open government services and their users. 



Several keynoters were invited to provide for the best practices from the public and private sectors, both locally and internationally on issues surrounding the cyber security challenges associated with increasing citizens’ access to government data. The preview of the program can be traced in the USyd’s website page here.

The conference was split up into 3 thematic panels:

1. Open Government and Cyber Security in Australia. Three renowned personalities from Australian regulators spoke, namely Tim Pilgrim (Acting Australian Information Commissioner and Australian Privacy Commissioner); Elizabeth Tydd, (NSW Information Commissioner and Head of the Information and Privacy Commission); and Rolf Green, who was the Director of Information, ICT and Digital Government Division, Australian Department of Finance, Services and Innovation.

2. Open Government from Global Perspectives. In this session, I spoke alongside with an American Charles Bell, CEO of Startup Policy Lab (SPL); Dr. Janet Xu, Associate Researcher of the University of Oxford; and the Canadian Dr Khaled El Emam, himself a Professor at the University of Ottawa. I also like to note that this session was chaired by my friend Dr Adam Molnar, a lecturer in criminology at the Deakin University, Victoria, Australia.

3. Privacy, Surveillance and Government Services. This afternoon session presented a speakers from a diverse background, namely Dr. Elizabeth Coombs, NSW Privacy Commissioner; Professor Fleur Johns, Associate Dean (Research) UNSW; Bernard Keane, Crikey’s political editor.

Advertisements

Personal Data Protection in the Malaysian E-Government: Has the PDP Act 2010 got any place?

By: Sonny Zulhuda

ImageMajor legal issues on data privacy in Malaysia were resolved with the introduction of the Personal Data Protection Act (PDPA) 2010. Being the main legal framework for protecting data privacy of individuals, PDPA regulates the processing of personal data in commercial transactions and to provide for matters connected therewith.

Under section 4, “personal data” refers to any “data that relates directly or indirectly to a data subject, who is identified or identifiable from that information or from that and other information in the possession of a data user, including any sensitive personal data and expression of opinion about the data subject.”

Meanwhile, “commercial transactions” mean “any transaction of a commercial nature, whether contractual or not, which includes any matters relating to the supply or exchange of goods or services, agency, investments, financing, banking and insurance.”

The enactment of the PDPA is arguably a milestone for the development of e-commerce and e-government in Malaysia, considering that a massive and increasingly valuable amount of personal information are being stored, processed and exploited. However, there is a cause for concern here that the Parliament has expressly excluded the application of PDPA to the Federal Government and State Governments in section 3. Commentators opined that this exclusion would have a far-reaching implication in terms of the development of data protection law in Malaysia. Nevertheless, it is argued that this law can still help protect the security of e-government in Malaysia in one way or another.

Continue reading

  • October 2019
    M T W T F S S
    « Sep    
     123456
    78910111213
    14151617181920
    21222324252627
    28293031  
  • Visitor

    free counters

  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 1,630 other followers